Posts Tagged ‘learning’

Feb 13th, 2017

Embrace the Strange.

My wife gave a TedX talk on finding the extraordinary in the ordinary moments. Those times when you think, “Never in a Million Years”.   On the same night, my friend Kevin gave a TedX talk on finding comfort in the uncomfortable. Both talks were profound, touching, and comical. I walked away reminded to observe.   It was also a point of reflection on my own process from the first marks of a pen in the studio to the artist’s reception.

In the beginning of the movie “Pollock” starring Ed Harris, Jackson Pollock is standing at an opening of his work, several people approach him for autographs, he politely signs, but as he does he also looks around. His eyes move across the room, observing, looking for something, he is searching for or observing the order in the chaos. He is a stranger in a room full of friends, family, collectors, and art lovers.   It is a moment that I feel most artists have had as they put their work on display for friends, family, and strangers alike.

Why do we do this? It’s a question that is asked not just by the audience, but also by the artists themselves. I ask myself in those moments, why? Then I try to embrace those who have come to share in my work. The work is done most often in isolation, but the presentation of the product “the art”, is shown for public consumption. It is a juxtaposition built into the creative process. I have openings to share the art, to see response, to share in a moment. It is amazing that people will give of their time to share with me. It’s humbling when you put your work out there for everyone to see and people show up to see it. Its that moment that is so perfectly portrayed in the “Pollock” film. As the artists  you are standing alone in a room and you cast your eyes to see all those who have come to share. Its intense, its inevitable, its humbling, and you and your art are vulnerable.

It sounds pretentious,but I have handlers at my shows.  Their job is to move me around the room.  If left to my own devices in this moment, I know I will retreat to a friend and stand in the corner and talk in isolation. Someone once said, she feels like she’s in charge of a dog at a dog show, as she pushes and pulls me around the gallery. The reality is, I love people, I love socializing, and I live off the energy of motivation and conversation. I’m not saying I’m good at it, in-fact I often have to apologize for what I’ve  said, but the truth is it balances the isolation in which the art is made.

At the end of the day, it is part of my job, it is what I do, it is who I am, it is normal, it is strange, it is part of the process. Some moments are stranger than others, but I find comfort when I remember to embrace the strange.

Cory

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Oct. 22nd.

Going Backwards to move Forwards.

Since moving to Shanghai, I have found that on the other side of the world you have to work from back to front. Usually you start by finding a studio and then begin finding all the items and materials you need to make art, however, this has not been the case here.

I have found all the things that I need to make art. I have found an art store, a person to custom make large stretchers and canvases, all the paint I could want. The needle in the haystack, so to speak is finding a  foundry for bronze casting that is willing to work with you.  I have not only found a bronze foundry, I have found a foundry where their representative speaks english and their work is good.

What is usually the starting point has become the ending/beginning.  Today I signed the lease agreement for the Airy Hill Studio Shanghai Branch. This process has been an exciting and challenging study in patience, understanding, learning, and humor. The details are sketchy, but I am pretty sure I just signed a studio lease for a year so I have a place to make art. There will be a lot of work to get the space ready, and I can begin the cleaning and building process on Monday. I will go into depth in the next post and will include pictures of the process. The reality is, I am tired, and have spent a lot of time and energy today, and just finished celebrating with friends and family so will have to leave you with this bit of food for thought.

Paul Herr once told me in his Paul Herr raspy, good hearted yet Clint Eastwood voice. He said. “Hey Cory, you have to take diversions from your normal path. If you don’t, your normal path will stop moving forward and your art will die.”   I miss Paul, but as I signed a lease today with a pen and a thumbprint, I think I have taken my fare share of diversions over the past few years.

The art process is very much alive, my spirits are high, my motivation is high, and I am ready to continue to trust the process no matter how backwards forwards may feel.  Signing Shanghai Contract. copy